Thinking Anew

Day 22 - 30 Days on the Oracle Cloud

All sorts of functions

Oracle Function was announced late last year (2018), with limited availability to select Oracle Cloud customers. The platform is built on Fn and is Oracle’s solution for developers wanting to deploy services using a Serverless Framework.

As succinctly explained by Kaslin Fields, a Fn function is a small embodiment of code that listens and speaks to HTTP streams. Ideally, each Fn function serves one, and only one purpose. It can be implemented in wide variety of programming languages and they are listed here (see the list of runtime options available).

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Day 17 - 30 days on the Oracle Cloud

Autonomous TT

In case you missed it (which is almost impossible), the Oracle Autonomous Database (AutonomousDB) is Oracle’s hottest offering on the Oracle Cloud and it now comes fitted with what is arguably the best feature of the Oracle Database: Oracle Application Express (APEX). I have a few more days to go with this trial, so why not take one out for a spin?

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Relocating Compute Instances

Moving a House, New Zealand Style

To everyone following my 30 Days on the Oracle Cloud experience, I apologise that I was not able to keep up with the series previously, due to work commitments. I have enrolled in yet another trial, so I am hoping to continue where I left off and share my thirty day adventure with an Oracle Cloud trial. I’m on Day 14 now, and for this post, I’ll examine an important issue that many of us face, even in our personal life - moving houses!

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Seattle Take Two

The Oracle Downtown Seattle Office Building

I was glad to be back in Seattle to attend the 2019 edition of ODTUG’s famed Kscope conference. This is the second time the event is held this close to home (read my previous recount of the same conference five years ago)! And like every Kscope before, the conference always provides unique experiences, bountiful knowledge and new people to meet! Here’s a quick summary and highlights of my week.

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Social Sign In with Azure

Photo by Gerd Altmann

Since Oracle Application Express (APEX) version 18.1, application developers are able to easily integrate OAuth2-based authentication using many popular identity providers including Google, Facebook and Microsoft. Morten Braten, Anton Nielsen and I have previously written on this subject.

Starting May 2019, Microsoft is changing how developers manage their OAuth2 application registrations.

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Day 15 - 30 Days on the Oracle Cloud

Photo by Genty

One of my fondest memories of my previous job was working with VMware virtualization products. With VMware Workstation, system administrators had the ability to “move” a virtual machine (VM) from a local workstation to vSphere. It was no surprise then that I was very exited (and itching to play) when VirtualBox 6.0 was released with a new feature: support for exporting a VM to Oracle Cloud Infrastructure (OCI)!

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Day 2 - 30 Days on the Oracle Cloud

Remember this ad?

IBM BladeCenters were revolutionary at its time. System Administrators would know that one of the largest expense when building out a server infrastructure is real estate costs. Shrinking racks of servers and consolidating into blade servers meant you could put more hardware in less space. However, they were expensive and had their fair share of skeptics. Adopting a proprietary backbone simply meant you were investing into a brand and hence subject to vendor lock-in.

Then came virtualization. With more powerful CPUs, cheaper RAMs and more cost-effective storage solutions, we are now able to cramp more servers into a single server. Other pieces of traditional server infrastructure, e.g. network and storage, could be “software-defined”. The server footprint very much “vanished into thin air”!

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Day 0 - 30 Days on the Oracle Cloud

Photo by JuergenPM

I have read many comments on social media and blogs about various experiences using the Oracle Cloud for hosting web applications and databases. There are probably more bad than good accounts, and so I wanted to experience the process myself using a trial subscription.

Typically, a trial account only gets you a US$300 credit to use on the Oracle Cloud. The credits are good 30 days, after that, either your upgrade to a paid plan, or you lose everything. You are also required to provide a valid credit card for verification purposes only. According to the sign up page, users are only billed after choosing to “upgrade” the account.

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